PEANUTS EVERY SUNDAY 1952-1955
ISBN : 978-1-60699-692-8
Editorial : LIBROS IMPORTACION
Colección : N/D
Edición : Cartoné
Tipo : COMICS
Páginas : 128
Idioma : No informado
52,90 €     50,26 €

The first in a series of 10 massive coffee-table-quality books, each one containing a half-decade s worth of Peanuts Sunday strips re-mastered to match the original syndicate coloring. Since their original publication, Peanuts Sundays have almost always been collected and reprinted in black and white, and generations of Peanuts fans have grown up enjoying this iteration of these strips. But many who read Peanuts in their original Sunday papers remain fond of the striking coloring, which makes for a surprisingly different reading experience. It is for these fans (and for Peanuts fans in general who want to experience this alternate/original version) that we now present a series of larger, Sundays-only Peanuts reprints. As with most strips, Peanuts showed by far the quickest and richest development in its first decade, and Peanuts Every Sunday: 1952-1955, by compiling every strip from the first four years, offers a fascinating peek at Schulz s evolving creative process. Not only does the graphic side of the strips change drastically, from the strip s initial stiff, ultra-simple stylizations through a period of uncommonly lush, detailed drawings to something close to the final, elegant Peanuts style we ve all come to know and love, but several main characters are gradually introduced ? oddly enough, usually as infants who would then grow up to full, articulate Peanut-hood! ? and then refined: Schroeder, Lucy, and Linus. Full color About the Author: Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post?as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts?and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day?and the day before his last strip was published?having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand?an unmatched achievement in comics.

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